Programs & Services

The Prescott Fire Department provides a high level of Fire Prevention, Fire Suppression and All-Hazard Response Services, to the residents of the City of Prescott and its surrounding communities.

The area that is protected by the PFD covers large portions of wildland and wildland/urban interface. The department strives to maintain a 3-6 minute response time to most areas within the City of Prescott on all emergencies.

The City of Prescott maintains an ISO rating of a 4 with 1 being the best. The average fire hydrant has a 1000-gallon per minute rating. The City has its own water supply for hydrants and Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority supplies water tenders for the urban areas around the City.

Ladder 72
Ladder 72

All frontline engines have pumps of 1000-1500 gallons per minute and carry 500-750 gallons of water onboard. Each engine carries a complete complement of ladders, forcible entry tools and vehicle extrication equipment (jaws of life) and is staffed with at least one certified emergency paramedic at all times.

The PFD has a very close working relationship with Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority. This District is located in the Prescott Basin and border the City of Prescott. The Prescott National Forest surrounds the City of Prescott on 3 sides of our response areas. Our department has a very close working relationship with the Prescott National Forest Fire crews. Station 71 houses a Forest Service Type 3 engine manned with 4-7 personnel. The PFD has several engines specifically for wildland/urban interface fire suppression.

 

 

CONTACT

  • Fire
  • Fire Admin
  • Fire Department

    1700 Iron Springs Rd

  • 928-777-1700
  • TDD: 928-445-6811
  • 928-776-1890

FAQ

  • Yes. Citizens should stay away from the swarm if possible and let bees move on to a different area. In a non-emergency situation call a bee control company in your yellow pages in your phone directory. Or you may contact the PFD dispatch non-emergency number, (928) 445-5357 or 911 in an emergency.

  • Although a cat in a tree is rarely ever an emergency the department will on occasion make a “non-emergency response” at a low priority to “put eyes on the situation at hand”.  Often times a can of tuna opened and placed at the bottom of the location where the cat is located will coax them down.  We are of the opinion that it is better to respond and not initiate action versus not respond and be called upon to after an untoward event occurs.

NEWS

Prescott Named Among Most Charming Small Cities in Arizona by TravelMag.com

Posted on May 22, 2018

Prescott was named as one of the “Most Charming Small Cities in Arizona”, by TravelMag.com.  This designation was given following a survey of over 100 travel writers, photographers and social media influencers. The article mentions Prescott’s unique combination of outdoor… Read more »

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